How Much Does it Cost To Get A Will in Ireland?

Making a will is an important step in securing your assets and ensuring that your wishes are carried out after your death. However, many people are unsure about how much it costs to get a will in Ireland. Here’s a breakdown of the costs involved:

Solicitor Fees:


Solicitors are legal professionals who can help you create a will. Their fees can vary depending on their experience and the complexity of your estate. On average, you can expect to pay between €150 and €300 for a simple will, while a more complex will can cost up to €1,000 or more.
Some solicitors may offer to include the writing of a simple will for free when they deal with the purchase of a house for a client.


A standard (simple) will for a couple with children will typically pass the estate in full to the surviving partner in the event of the death of one of the couple.
Usually – in the event of the death of the second partner – the estate is then split evenly between the children.


Of course – you are free to make any arrangements you wish.

DIY Wills:
DIY will kits are a cheaper alternative to using a solicitor. They can be purchased online or in stationery shops and typically cost between €15 and €50. However, it’s important to note that DIY wills may not be legally binding if they’re not completed correctly.

Will Storage:
Once you have made a will, you will need to store it safely to ensure that it is not lost or destroyed. Many solicitors offer will storage services for an additional fee. The cost of will storage can range from nothing to €50-€100 per year.

Updating a Will:
If you need to update your will, you may need to pay additional fees. The cost of updating a will can vary depending on the changes that need to be made. For example, if you need to add or remove a beneficiary, the cost may be lower than making significant changes to your estate plan.

What Happens if You Don’t Have a Will ?

If you die without leaving a will in Ireland, the distribution of your estate will be determined by the laws of intestacy. (Succession Act 1965)

Without a will – the distribution of the estate of a person who dies will be as follows:

  1. If the deceased is survived by a spouse or civil partner but has no children , the entire estate will pass to the spouse or civil partner.
  2. If the deceased is survived by a spouse or civil partner and children, the spouse or civil partner will receive two-thirds of the estate and the remaining one-third will be divided equally among the children.
  3. If the deceased is survived by children or other descendants but has no spouse or civil partner, the estate will be divided equally among the children.
  4. If the deceased is survived by parents but no spouse, civil partner, or children, the estate will be divided equally between the parents.
  5. If the deceased is survived by siblings but no spouse, civil partner, children, or parents, the estate will be divided equally among the siblings.

If there are no surviving relatives, the estate will pass to the State.

This shows that it is recommended to have a will in place to ensure that your estate is distributed according to your wishes.

Solicitor Fees For House Purchase

Law Society of Ireland